See You Next Wednesday
Thursday, September 21
 
There aren't any wrong answers.

According to the trainer on the business analysis course I went to: there are no wrong answers, only different people's interpretations. I tested his assertion and it may be true, at least in his training room. When our team made deliberate omissions the answer was not wrong. Even when our team made diliberate errors the answer was not wrong. In fact, when we made deliberate misinterpretations the answer was not wrong. I toyed with the idea of drawing a data flow diagram which looked like a duck.

I think other people were testing his assertion too. When one team proposed amalgamating the "Customer Order" with the "Stock Ledger" while maintaining separate "Back Order" and "Stock Receipt" data stores, the answer was not wrong either. What the trainer did say was "an Order data store and a Product data store would be another solution", and he was surprised no team had thought of it. Ironically, he was standing next to another team's big colourful data flow diagram featuring an "Order File" and a "Product File". (I don't know why they both changed "stock" to "product", but they did.)

We learned other things, tarred with the same authority:
1. When do you write the specification? Whenever is most sensible.
2. We learned about Exhaustive Decision Tables which could resolve a decision in all circumstances. Somebody asked what the question marks meant. Somebody else pointed out the footnote which identified the question marks as "unresolved".
3. We learned the difference between Business Process Review and Total Quality Management. If you had a process which took a fortnight: BPR would reduce the time by ten percent; TQM would reduce the time to a day.

He regretted we couldn't go into some of the topics a bit more: "We only have four days, not five or six or seven or eight. Five or six or seven or eight would be too long anyway.".

And in return for his knowledge I was able to give him some advice about his people skills. When he told me he was "going to get a smile out of me" and struck me lightly on the upper arm, I told him "not if you keep hitting me".

Better now.

Last night I went to the theatre to see The 5th Door.
 
Comments:
sounds like fun. (for a given value of 'fun'.)
did you play jargon bingo?
 
(at the training. not at the door...)
 
*snort*

How was the dancing?
 
hehe, you should become a trainer, Xopher. You're positively brilliant!
 
I didn't think of playing jargon bingo, but if I had it might have become idiolect bingo. He had coined a few phrases: "data conversation", "work in process" and, my favouite, "take one hat on and put another hat on".
 
The dancing was good, most everything about the show was good. I thought the narrative (girls are cruel to boys who are in turn cruel to girls; lets all fall in love) wasn't worthy of the rest of the production.
 
Noooooooo! Edward deBono. Run for your beanies! We don't want your hats!
 
so, shy is wearing the "black hat".
(or possibly the "red hat". or, because she is considering her thinking process, the "blue hat".)
 
Actually they were an analysis hat and a design hat; you might have to "request yourself" which hat you were wearing if you are unsure how to proceed.
 
"not if you keep hitt me" got a smile out of me.
 
If I had been at something this half-arsed, I doubt I could have kept my job with all the mockery and ridicule that would have gone on.
 
Post a Comment

<< Home
This may not sound like the snappiest line from 2001: A Space Odyssey (1968), but it evidently caught the imagination of John Landis, who has worked references to a mythical film of this name into most of his own movies - memorably as the grotty British skinflick watched by an assortment of lycanthropes and zombies in the climax of An American Werewolf in Paris [sic] (1981). Ghastly Beyond Belief, Neil Gaiman and Kim Newman

My Photo
Name:
Location: Canberra, Australian Capital Territory, Australia

Large balding wishful male anglo.

ARCHIVES
December 2001 / January 2002 / February 2002 / March 2002 / April 2002 / May 2002 / June 2002 / July 2002 / August 2002 / November 2002 / December 2002 / January 2003 / February 2003 / March 2003 / April 2003 / May 2003 / June 2003 / July 2003 / August 2003 / September 2003 / October 2003 / November 2003 / December 2003 / June 2004 / July 2004 / August 2004 / September 2004 / October 2004 / November 2004 / December 2004 / January 2005 / February 2005 / March 2005 / April 2005 / May 2005 / June 2005 / July 2005 / August 2005 / September 2005 / October 2005 / November 2005 / December 2005 / January 2006 / February 2006 / March 2006 / April 2006 / May 2006 / June 2006 / July 2006 / August 2006 / September 2006 / October 2006 / November 2006 / December 2006 / January 2007 / February 2007 / March 2007 / April 2007 / May 2007 / June 2007 / July 2007 / August 2007 / September 2007 / October 2007 / November 2007 / December 2007 / January 2008 / February 2008 / March 2008 / May 2008 / June 2008 / July 2008 / August 2008 / September 2008 / October 2008 / November 2008 / December 2008 / January 2009 / February 2009 / March 2009 / April 2009 / May 2009 / June 2009 / July 2009 / August 2009 / September 2009 / October 2009 / November 2009 / December 2009 / January 2010 / February 2010 / March 2010 / April 2010 / May 2010 / June 2010 / July 2010 / August 2010 / September 2010 / October 2010 / November 2010 / January 2011 / February 2011 / March 2011 / April 2011 / May 2011 / June 2011 / July 2011 / August 2011 / October 2011 / December 2011 / January 2012 / February 2012 / March 2012 / April 2012 / January 2014 / February 2014 / March 2014 / April 2014 / May 2014 / June 2014 / July 2014 / September 2014 / January 2016 / June 2016 /


Powered by Blogger